Government Urges Changes to Google Books Deal – Assignment Example

The paper "Government Urges Changes to Google Books Deal" is a perfect example of a law assignment. The Justice Department’s suggestion to the parties involved in the Google Books Deal reflects the concerns of not only the opponents of Google but people from all over the world who make a living out of books in some way or the other. It is, of course, good news for most of the customers of books, including professionals and students, that incredible amount of information can be made available to them through scanned books. It is an amazing idea to access about twenty percent of the books before choosing and buying any kind of book which could otherwise have been unavailable in certain places and times for several reasons. However, the New York Times article by Miguel Helft reveals how contenders are concerned that “Google’s virtual lock on orphan works would make it virtually impossible for others to compete”. Another major issue relates to the way it would jeopardize copyright law “by granting Google a blanket license to millions of books unless authors specifically object” (Helft). The general feeling that book publishers and consumers get from the way the parties involved in the deal react is that they are willing to reconsider issues of concern. Google even welcomes their opponents to follow their examples and provide healthy competition. Richard Koman has posted the four main points Google explains regarding the deal, emphasizing that it is a “strong complement to, and not a substitute for, orphan works legislation” (Koman). Orphan works are the books whose authors are not known or cannot be found. Rival group Microsoft and others like Amazon had expressed their displeasure and fear regarding the clause which provides Google the right to exploit orphan works “for unspecified future uses” quoted from Helft). Microsoft even called the scheme an “unprecedented misuse of the judicial system” (Johnson). Since Google is willing to negotiate with these concerns, I feel the Deal should be pursued with proper understanding among all the parties involved. Otherwise, a golden opportunity to access millions of books through the electronic medium will be lost in the process of long legal battles.