Security in the Post 9/11 Era – Assignment Example

The paper "Security in the Post 9/11 Era" is a wonderful example of an assignment on social science.
My main point is security in the post 9/11 era has become ridiculously flawed. The American public wants to feel safe, so they support this ridiculously flawed security in order to feel that they have done everything possible. I support my views through hypothetical questions like “What if we would have taken the Russian warning more seriously, what if we would have taken Osama bin Laden more seriously, what if we would have never gotten involved in the first Gulf War, what if we would have had stricter airport security?” I also support my views with facts from Mr. Schneier’s editorial like “There are two classes of contraband at airport security checkpoints: the class that will get you in trouble if you try to bring it on an airplane, and the class that will cheerily be taken away from you if you try to bring it on an airplane.”

My intended audience is the general American public, especially those who fly. These Americans fly for business or leisure. The audience I target does not have to fly, but be interested in American safety.

I assume my target audience has an average knowledge of 9/11 and the security procedures in American airports. I also assume that Americans want to be protected from terrorists, but are tired of the hassle of unfounded security measures that do not work.

I responded to the assumption that the items taken away from passengers, who are then allowed on the plane, are not dangerous. These items are not dangerous because they are placed in a bin located in the middle of the airport.

Logos was used by pointing out the logical and illogical aspects of the security arguments. Ethos was used by using Mr. Schneier’s editorial. Pathos was used by invoking 9/11 and the frustration at the airport security.

The general tone is disapproval of current security measures, but light enough not to be controversial.

The most effective part of my letter is the argument that Americans want to feel safe.
The most effective part was “I believe the answer subconsciously is Americans want to feel safe. Feeling safe is not only better for the peace of mind, but can be used as an excuse if anything does happen. After 9/11, Americans looked back at the warning signs. What if we would have taken the Russian warning more seriously, what if we would have taken Osama bin Laden more seriously, what if we would have never gotten involved in the first Gulf War, what if we would have had stricter airport security? All of these doubts gnawed at the American public. Today if the same events as 9/11 happened, Americans could say that they are doing everything possible to prevent terrorism. The feeling of safety is more important than actual safety.”
I probably needed to be more persuasive in my argument. A more passionate statement might have made people see this issue my way in a better manner.