Aeneid – Essay Example

Honor: The terminology of honor has been used differently in the Aeneid as compared to Iliad (The Iliad and the Aeneid). In Aeneid the hero Aeneas has honor in protecting the rights of the people, where as in Iliad the honor of hero Achilles was personal Greek honor. This difference could be present because the Roman system of rule was democracy and thus a hero was needed who could think beyond his own glory, upholding the state in any circumstances.
Sacrifice:
Sacrifice is takes many form in Aeneid. One is where human life is taken as a ritual, a religious killing a tribute to gods, such as the death of Laocoon’s at the altar (American Journal of Philology). This theme basically describes the prevalence of a supernatural phenomenon when even great human characteristics such as Bravery and courage fail to give victory. Sacrifice is also represented as giving up ones own desires for the greater good.
Duty:
Aeneid provides continual conflict between duty and passion. When Jupiter sends mercury to remind Aeneas of his duty he is left with no choice but to part from dido, who is represented as the extreme symbol of passion and thus takes her own life with Aeneas sword.
Leadership:
The themes of leadership are again signified as important traits because the land was no longer being ruled by born ruler but by those who deserved to lead the people. As compared to the Greek idea of leadership as personal glory, the Roman idea of leadership is represented as glory of the state and well being of the people. (Antigone and Aeneid: theme of leadership). In the text Antigone, Creon, and Dido fail to show this trait whereas Aeneas displays extraordinary leadership abilities. When called upon to sacrifice his feelings for Dido, Aeneas displays real Roman leadership qualities sacrificing his personal desires for his duties as a leader.
Storms:
The theme of storms is again a representation of opposition in the Aeneid, such as calm weather against storms. The book starts with Juno raising a storm on the Trojan fleet but Neptune taking notice and calming the winds. The contrast between fury and benevolence is against represented by the clear distinction between a calm, peaceful weather and ragging reckless storm.
Works Cited
‘Antigone and Aeneid: theme of leadership.’ Mind Relief.
Virgil. The Aeneid. Trans. John Dryden.
Smith, Rebekah M. Deception and Sacrifice in Aeneid 2.1-249
American Journal of Philology - Volume 120, Number 4 (Whole Number 480), winter 1999, pp. 503-523