Langston Hughes And Alice Walker – Research Paper Example

Everyday Use by Alice Walker and I’m Still Here by Langston Hughes Roll No: Teacher: 20th November 2009 Everyday Use by Alice Walker and I’m Still Here by Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes in his poem, I’m Still Here ensures that he survives after many hardships that he has suffered. Race and alienation are the themes of I’m Still Here by Langston Hughes. The poem is quite short but it’s much more revealing. The speaker of the poem informs about the oppression that he has faced because of race. He says that he has faced many hardships in his life because of his being different in color. He suffers all kinds of difficulties in his life but he is still hopeful and recognizes his survival. He reveals the oppressiveness of white people by saying,
“Tried to make me
Stop laughin’, stop lovin, stop livin’—”
(I’m Still Here, Line 6-7)
It is because of his race that he has suffered oppression and subjugation. He has to bear the adversities on the basis of his color and race. He is alienated from the rest of his society because of his being regarded as separate or an outsider. Because of his being considered as an outcast, he is dealt adversely by the white people. All these circumstances have led to his loneliness and seclusion. The similar themes of alienation and race can be found in Everyday Use. The characters of Everyday Use feel alienated and isolated because of their African origin.
Racial awareness is depicted by Maggie’s mother claim that she wants to stay away from places where she finds white faced people. She says at one point, “It seems to me I have talked to them always with one foot raised in flight, and with my head turned in whichever way is farthest from them”. She hesitates when she meets people belonging to other races because of her belonging to African background. She is fully aware of her being black due to which, she is unable to face the eyes of white people.
References
Hughes, Langston. (2004). I’m Still Here. Classic Poetry Series: Langston Hughes. PoemHunter.com – The World’s Poetry Archive. P. 50.
Walker, Alice. (1994). “Everyday Use”. Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell. Fort Worth: Harcourt, pp. 288-295.