U.S./Pakistan Security Ties After September 11th 2001 Include Benazir Bhutto, Also A Little About – Research Proposal Example

U.S./Pakistan Security Ties after September 11th 2001: Executive Summary The world forever changed the morning of September 11th 2001. The attacks on the World Center represented the most serious terrorist act ever carried out on U.S. soil. A watershed moment in world history, that fateful morning will be forever engrained in the American national psyche. From a political, social and economic perspective, the hijackings of 9/11 were unparalleled in scope and sheer devastation. Political scientists have been wracking their brains trying to make sense the horrific violence undertaken the morning of 9/11 and further violence inspired by global jihadists bent on taking over the world. Terrorism – and the threat of terror - can have political, social, and economic ramifications.
The United States and Pakistan, sharing security concerns in the post-9/11 world, have actively worked in tandem to combat terrorism. Accordingly, security ties have increased proportionate to American engagement in the region. Seeking to explore the complex American-Pakistani security relationship in the wake of September 11th 2001, this essay aims to be thorough with an analysis of the variety of important contributing factors to this important bilateral relationship. We will address the American-Pakistani security relationship in a historical perspective, dating back to the Cold War, as well as analyze current events such as the shocking assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and the paralyzing instability of Pakistani domestic politics in recent times. What is the security relationship between Pakistan and the United States? How has this relationship changed in the post-9/11 world? Seeking to address these questions and many more, this essay will provide a holistic approach to analyzing a relationship which is seeped in complexity and intrigue (Hilali 2005).
Work Cited
Hilali, A.Z. US-Pakistan Relationship: Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan. London: Ashgate Publishing, 2005.