Working Parent – Research Proposal Example

A working parent has to juggle their job and home life. In today’s economy, parents do not always have a choice about working. Holding down a job is a necessity for a majority of households. Working parents must figure out issues like childcare, child pickup from school, and illness. Guilt can be a constant companion for a working parent. The key to solving the problems above is strong community ties, a support group, caution, and trust.
Around seventy percent of women work out (Eberstadt, 204, p. 20). This includes all women, not just mothers. However that figure is high. Single parents have to work to support their families. Other parents choose to work out and build careers. Whatever the reason, the rise of single parents have become a trend.
Working parents need childcare. Some parents schedule childcare around family members, others choose daycare. School is another option, but schools are not flexible. Not many parents work solely during school hours. Working parents with higher pay might even hire a nanny. Many daycares, schools, and other babysitters will not take care of a sick child. This means a parent must take off to take care of the child or make other arrangements. Reliable childcare is a necessity. The first concern of parents working out is childcare.
Many parents feel guilty for being away from their children. In order to alleviate this guilt, single parents have to make wise choices. This includes strong community ties. A close tie with schools, daycare, and even neighbors watching older children come home are a must. If a parent cannot see what their child is doing, they must have others keep them informed. The guilt of working out can be erased by making the best choices in their personal situation.
The number of working parents has been on the rise, especially mothers. This means reliable daycare or childcare must be found. Strong community ties and childcare can help a parent make good decisions for their situation. Life is hard for working parents, but with the right help it can be possible.

Bibliography
Eberstadt, M. (2004)). Home-alone America: The hidden toll of day care, behavioral drugs,
and other parent substitutes. USA: Sentinel HC.
LaRowe, M. (2009). Working moms 411: How to manage kids, career and home. USA:
Regal.
Sale, J.S. (1996). The working parents handbook. New York: 1996.